Styles

MAD systems is comprised of the following systems and arts:
FMA (PTK: Pekiti-Tirsia Kali)

Filipino martial arts (FMA) (Filipino: Sining panlaban ng Pilipinas) refer to ancient Indianized and newer fighting methods devised in the Philippines. It incorporates elements from both Western and Eastern Martial Arts, the most popular forms of which are known as Arnis, Eskrima and Kali. The intrinsic need for self-preservation was the genesis of these systems. Throughout the ages, invaders and evolving local conflict imposed new dynamics for combat in the islands now making up the Philippines. The Filipino people developed battle skills as a direct result of an appreciation of their ever-changing circumstances. They learned often out of necessity how to prioritize, allocate and use common resources in combative situations. Filipinos have been heavily influenced by a phenomenon of cultural and linguistic mixture. Some of the specific mechanisms responsible for cultural and martial change extended from phenomena such as war, political and social systems, technology, trade and practicality.

The style of FMA we practice at MAD Systems is Pekiti-Tirsia Kali (PTK).  PTK is a highly effective close-quarters fighting art indigenous to the Visayan region of the Philippines.

Based on tactics and strategies derived from edged weapons, Pekiti-Tirsia Kali is a complete system incorporating both weapons and empty hands methods. Designed for both single and multiple attackers, Pekiti-Tirsia is an ancient art that has evolved to stay relevant for modern combat and self-defense scenarios.

Pekiti-Tirsia is proven effective in combat and invaluable for preparing Operators of the law enforcement and military community. In the country of origin, Pekiti-Tirsia has become the basis for the official combatives programs of the Armed Forces of the Philippines and Philippine National Police. Internationally, it has been taught to thousands of police and military Special Operations personnel in the United States, Europe, India, Russia and across Asia.

Officially founded in 1897 by Grand Master Conrado Tortal. Pekiti-Tirsia was reserved in secret as a family system to defend the Tortal land until the art was brought to the U.S. in 1972 by Grand Master Leo Tortal Gaje Jr., the grandson of Conrado Tortal and heir to the Pekiti-Tirsia System. Since then, Pekiti-Tirsia Kali has expanded worldwide and influenced the creation of dozens of off-shoot combat systems.

Glíma

This is the name of the Scandinavian martial art used by the Vikings. The word glíma in Old Norse means glimpse or flash, which describes the systems techniques.  Glima as a self-defence system contains throws, strikes, kicks, chokes, locks, pain techniques and weapon techniques, and is comparable with the best complete martial arts systems from around the world. Glima as self-defence was the foundation for the Viking warrior, and these techniques are still practiced in Scandinavia, Europe, North America and South America.

Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA)/ Western Martial Arts (WMA)

Refers to martial arts of European origin, particularly using arts formerly practised, but having since died out or evolved into very different forms.  While there is limited surviving documentation of the martial arts of Classical Antiquity (such as Ancient Greek wrestling or Gladiatorial combat), surviving dedicated technical treatises or combat manuals date to the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. For this reason, the focus of HEMA is de facto on the period of the half-millennium of ca. 1300 to 1800, with a German and an Italian school flowering in the Late Middle Ages and the Renaissance (14th to 16th centuries), followed by Spanish, French, English and Scottish schools of fencing in the modern period (17th and 18th centuries). Arts of the 19th century such as classical fencing, and even early hybrid styles such as Bartitsu may also be included in the term HEMA in a wider sense, as may traditional or folkloristic styles attested in the 19th and early 20th centuries, including forms of folk wrestling and traditional stick fighting methods.

The term Western martial arts (WMA) is sometimes used in the United States and in a wider sense including modern and traditional disciplines. During the Late Middle Ages, the longsword had a position of honour among these disciplines, and sometimes historical European swordsmanship (HES) is used to refer to swordsmanship techniques specifically.

WING CHUN (詠春)

is a concept-based Chinese martial art and form of self-defense utilizing both striking and grappling while specializing in close-range combat. It is a relatively young martial art, with most historians agreeing that it developed in southern China approximately 300 years ago.

Muay Thai /Thai boxing

is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. This discipline is known as the “Art of Eight Limbs” because it is characterized by the combined use of fists, elbows, knees and shins. Muay Thai became widespread internationally in the twentieth century, when practitioners from Thailand began competing in Kickboxing, mixed rules matches, as well as matches under Muay Thai rules around the world. The professional league is governed by The Professional Boxing Association of Thailand (P.A.T) sanctioned by The Sports Authority of Thailand (S.A.T.), and World Professional Muaythai Federation (WMF) overseas.

It is similar to related styles in other parts of the Indian cultural sphere, namely Lethwei from Myanmar, Pradal Serey from Cambodia, Muay Lao from Laos, Tomoi from Malaysia

Bujinkan (武神館)

is an international martial arts organization based in Japan and headed by Masaaki Hatsumi. The combat system taught by this organization comprises nine separate ryūha, or schools, which are collectively referred to as Bujinkan Budō TaijutsuThe Bujinkan is most commonly associated with ninjutsu. However, Masaaki Hatsumi uses the term Budo (meaning martial way) as he says the ryūha are descended from historical samurai schools that teach samurai martial tactics and ninjutsu schools that teach ninja tactics.

Taijutsu (body combat art) is the Bujinkan system of unarmed defence using strikes, throws, holds, chokes and joint locks. It encompasses skill such as: koppo jutsu is the “way of attacking and/or using the skeletal structure”; “koshi jutsu” is the way of attacking muscles and weak points on the body; jutai jutsu is the “relaxed body method” teaching throwing, grappling and choking techniques and dakentai jutsu which emphasises strikes, kicks and blocks

The first levels of training, such as leaping, tumbling, break fall techniques and body conditioning, form the basis for taijutsu. They are needed to progress into other techniques such as unarmed combat and the use of tools and weapons. Once learned, Taijutsu techniques can be applied to any situation, armed or unarmed.

Ukidokan KickBoxing

Words are not enough to encapsulate the great Benny “The Jet” Urquidez’s own style of Martial Art, we practice and teach Ukidokan Kickboxing Levels 1-5 and our Instructor also studios Ukidokan the Art.  To find out more about Ukidokan and benny “The Jet” Urquidez follow this link www.BennyTheJet.com

Karate (空手)

is a martial art developed in the Ryukyu Kingdom. It developed from the indigenous Ryukyuan martial arts (called te (), “hand”; tii in Okinawan) under the influence of Chinese Kung Fu, particularly Fujian White Crane. Karate is now predominantly a striking art using punching, kicking, knee strikes, elbow strikes and open-hand techniques such as knife-hands, spear-hands, and palm-heel strikes. Historically, and in some modern styles, grappling, throws, joint locks, restraints, and vital-point strikes are also taught.